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2.6 Walking Challenge & 26 Toiletries Bags Completed Raising Funds for Lighthouse Women’s Aid

2.6 Walking Challenge & 26 Toiletries Bags Completed Raising Funds for Lighthouse Women’s Aid

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Our two challenges have raised almost £200 for Lighthouse Women’s Aid.  They do sterling work for women who have suffered domestic abuse and their services are no more needed than right now during lockdown. On Sunday 26th April our President Pat walked 2.6 kilometres, not very far but quite a long way for her.  Accompanied by her other half they left home just after 11am, taking the footpath through the fields to the bridge over the River Min (which meanders along to RSPB Minsmere), then continued to Fen Lane where they walked along until reaching the banked wood which is carpeted with bluebells.  A beautiful walk with lots of wildlife in evidence.  Then came back home arriving  at 12.10.  If you would like to make a donation please get in touch.   Lighthouse do a brilliant job helping women  who have suffered domestic abuse ,  and

ALL THAT SPARE TIME!  WHAT SPARE TIME?

ALL THAT SPARE TIME!  WHAT SPARE TIME?

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The saying ‘when one door closes, another opens’ is certainly true since the Covid-19 lockdown. Over the past year the club has made syringe driver bags for Ipswich Hospital for end-of-life and palliative care patients.  To the end of March 2020 approx 130 bags were donated.  Since lockdown a member has made round about 50!  She has slowed down a bit in case she runs out of material (all of which has been donated). We are not sure when we will be able to take them to the hospital, but at least we are doing something positive and will help somebody when they need such an item.     THEN ….. For the Ipswich Lighthouse ‘2.6 Challenge’ (in lieu of the London Marathon) to raise funds on 26th April a member is making 26 drawstring cotton toiletry bags to sell so that people can fill

QUIZ RUNNERS UP

QUIZ RUNNERS UP

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We were pleased to have fielded a team for SI Colchester’s Quiz evening on 28th February to raise funds for Colchester Soroptimists’ Youth Award 2019.  The event raised in the region of £600 to help sponsor the Award. It is good to support our sister clubs as and when we can. It was a most enjoyable evening with lovely soup and cake to keep us going half way through the evening. What was even more pleasurable was that we were runners up in the quiz.  Our first time ever!  And, we only missed winning by half a point; better luck next time team.  

Raising Funds for Orphans Schooling in Zimbabwe

Raising Funds for Orphans Schooling in Zimbabwe

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On Sunday June 24th (sadly clashing with a key England game in the World Cup) we participated in the Sproughton Fete to raise funds for the Pelandaba Orphan Fund, our current Regional Project.  No one could have known about the clash when the date for the fete was agreed. The fete was quiet but we nevertheless raised a reasonable amount through the generosity of those who came. The sole aim of this small charity, is to raise funds for the purpose of paying both the primary and secondary school fees of orphans living in and around Pelandaba, a suburb of Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.  The Fund operates under the umbrella of ZANE: Zimbabwe – A National Emergency.  Many of the children really excel and go on to take GCSE and A Levels.  

A HELPING HAND FOR ‘NEAT FEET’

A HELPING HAND FOR ‘NEAT FEET’

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We had a tombola stall at Sproughton Village Fete on 25th June to raise funds for our Regional Project ‘Neat Feet, Happy Hands’ in Kenya to help eradicate the ‘Jiggers’ parasite by providing bowls, medications, sandals to children (so that they do not miss out on schooling) and adults (so they can go to work). We raised £130, which means that we can help 260 feet! It costs just £1 per person for the treatment. Children at the fete enjoyed putting their hands into our bowl full of purple water (representing potassium permanganate solution, which is part of the treatment process).   We talked to a lot of people  and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves at the same time. We were even told that we were the fete’s ‘social conscience’ stall. What could be better than that.

EQUALITY: IF NOT NOW, WHEN?

EQUALITY: IF NOT NOW, WHEN?

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Our event held to celebrate the work of Lighthouse Women’s Aid, held at the University of Suffolk on 10th February, was a real success, thanks to the collaboration of all parties including the Students’ Union who did so much to plan and ensure that all went smoothly on the day. Many thanks to all involved. Matthew Bland, Head of Strategic Analysis for Norfolk and Suffolk Constabularies told us about his quantitative study involving 36,000 police records of domestic abuse between 2009 and 2014 recorded by Suffolk Constabulary. It provided very helpful data that now assists with police training on this subject and also to predict those most at risk. However, it also suggested there was a lot that police did not know about Domestic Abuse – the soft data. Come in Emma Bond, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Arts, Business and Applied Social Science at University

Toilet Twinning Update

Toilet Twinning Update

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  Back in September 2015 we mentioned we were raising money for ‘Toilet Twinning’. We’re delighted to tell you we raised £240, sufficient funds to pay for a block of toilets for a school.  We elected to have our toilets at a school in Sierra Leone.  And we have the certificate to prove it! We hope this will make an enormous difference to the children, particularly enabling girls to come to school whilst menstruating. Soroptimists in the UK also make washable sanitary towels and provide knickers for girls who would not otherwise be able to go to school every week in the month. Help us make a difference  by joining our organisation and supporting our projects locally and internationally. Women helping Women  

Raising Funds for our Projects

Raising Funds for our Projects

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There are 10 Soroptimist Clubs in the London & Anglia Region and every 2 years we work together raising funds for a particular joint project. The last 4 years have focused on training nurses at a hospital for HIV patients in S. Africa. Over the next 2 years we are going for a simple but effective project – the eradication of ‘jiggers’ a parasite usually found under the skin on feet and hands. An estimated 2.6 million Kenyans are infected with jiggers, a flea-like parasite that burrows under the skin. Left untreated, jiggers can lead to all kinds of secondary infections, loss of mobility and even death. Some 1.5 million children cannot go to school because of the condition, which is linked to poverty and poor hygiene.  There is currently no drug to cure jiggers, however the treatment is simple and extremely cost effective; jigger-infested body parts –