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70th Anniversary Women’s Writing Competition

70th Anniversary Women’s Writing Competition

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Women’s Writing Competition 2019 Competition now closed. Nantwich and District Soroptimists invited local people to submit articles for a writing competition to celebrate the Club’s 70th Anniversary on the topic: ‘An inspirational woman and her impact on my life and or the life of my community’ Prizes of up to £75 were awarded to the winning entries. Read the winning entries here: 2019 Writing Competition: The Winning Entries The winners! What a very special evening we had Tuesday 14 May.  We had invited the winners of our 2019 writing competition to attend our meeting and receive their prizes. It was lovely to meet the winners, Katy Mann (overall winner), Yasmin Jones (U18 winner) and Charlotte Oliver (Highly Commended) but what made the evening so special was the winners reading their essays, about an inspiring woman, to us. They read their entries beautifully and we were

Women in Education

Women in Education

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We understand how important education is to enabling women and girls achieve their potential in all areas of their lives, it is a theme of our previous articles about women in the law and women in health, and well researched. We are especially pleased then to have two speakers at our conference who are inspirational women from the education sector – a Primary Academy Principal, Joanna Young, and at the other end of the education journey in Higher Education, Professor Dame Janet Finch, former Vice-Chancellor of Keele University. We are looking forward to hearing about their own stories as well as their thoughts on educating women and girls in the modern millennial age.   There are many inspirational role models promoting education; we have chosen to highlight two women who have worldwide impact, but not just because they are famous for their roles or titles,

Women in Health

Women in Health

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We are delighted that Tracy Bullock, currently CEO of Mid Cheshire NHS Foundation Trust is speaking at our 70th Anniversary Conference. We are looking forward to hearing her story of success as a woman in the health world, where there are many, many women employed, but disproportionately less women in senior roles and in professions dominated by men. Let’s look at the facts – 77 % of the NHS workforce are women however just 47 % of very senior manager roles in the NHS are held by women. 54% of doctors in training are women, but only 36% of consultants are women. It has been tough for women to qualify as doctors – it’s taken quite a while for even Dr Who to be a woman, but the first woman to qualify as a doctor in Britain, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson had to overcome legal barriers as well

Women in the Law – 70th Anniversary Conference Blog

Women in the Law – 70th Anniversary Conference Blog

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Who are some of the amazing women in the law? What can we learn from them? Well, nowadays there is a reasonable gender balance amongst judges, with over half of judges under 40 being women, but just over 100 years ago it was a different story…   In 1904, Emmeline Pankhurst’s daughter Christabel was refused admission to the bar because of her gender. Much fun was had at the prospect of women barristers, with an image of a woman in crinolines, muffs and wigs sub-titled “probably the next absurdity” in Punch magazine from 1910 – some 12 years before the first generation of women was called to the Bar.   Carrie Morrison, Mary Pickup, Mary Sykes and Maud Crofts were the first women to pass the Law Society’s examinations to qualify as solicitors in 1922. Like many other early women solicitors, all except Maud Crofts

Raising Awareness of Modern Slavery

Raising Awareness of Modern Slavery

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Nantwich Soroptimists have been applauded for their anti slavery initiative: a report by Helen Piddock – Jones In mid November  2018 three members of SI Nantwich (Anne Thompson, Anne Barnard and Helen Piddock-Jones) attended a Modern Slavery Awareness event held at the Civic Hall in Nantwich. It was an excellent event, sponsored by the South Cheshire Chamber of Commerce and the Mayor of Nantwich, among others. The Speakers included the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority, the UK border force, the police and some big businesses who had discovered numerous slaves within their own workforce. In every town in the UK slaves are hidden in plain sight. They do their job but nobody knows where they live and their pay goes into somebody else’s pocket.  The Police and other authorities are now all set up and ready to act and move in, but they can only

Soroptimists National Conference 2018- a personal view

Soroptimists National Conference 2018- a personal view

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Caroline Marsh writes – My First SIGBI Conference – Liverpool 2018 – the tidied up twitter version! Off for a bit of social action at Soroptimists conference in Liverpool! That was my first tweet as we were on the train to Liverpool. I tweeted and re-tweeted over 100 tweets over the course of the conference, and they are really my notes of the event. I am sharing some of these with you to give a flavour of what went on and my reaction to the sessions. I didn’t tweet from every session, and here I have put a comment to say what some of these talks were about. Tweets / re-tweets in italics. Twitter is immediate, opinionated and personal. Inevitably this report back is all of those things. I also hope that doing it this way makes it mercifully shorter! Opening ceremony Great to be

16 days of Action to Orange the World! 25 November- 10 December 2018.

16 days of Action to Orange the World! 25 November- 10 December 2018.

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    16 days of Action to Orange the World! Soroptimists said NO to violence against Women –  25 November- 10 December 2018.                 International day for the Elimination of Violence against Women: 25 November Violence against women and girls affects one in three women worldwide. Whether at home, on the streets or during war, violence against women and girls is a human rights violation of pandemic proportions. Women and girls who experience violence are often blamed and their testimonies put in doubt. The fear of reprisals, of not being believed, and the stigma borne by the survivor has silenced the voices of millions of survivors of violence and masked the true extent of women’s continued horrific experiences. Not until the half of our population represented by women and girls can live free of fear, violence and everyday insecurity, can we truly

What have bras ever done for women? Blog by Caroline Marsh October 2018

What have bras ever done for women? Blog by Caroline Marsh October 2018

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Our Club meeting in October 2018 has prompted a blog by Caroline Marsh…. What is supportive, lifts you up, and always close to your heart? Yes, it could be your best friend, but we are talking about bras here, lots of them, through the ages and social twists and turns of the last century. Our dinner speaker in October was Janet Blake who brought lots of garments for us to see and gave a gentle and informative talk about bras, slips, petticoats pyjamas and other undergarments. It was an opportunity for a history lesson for some and to reminisce for others – one of our members even shared that she had even been a model for Spirella corsets! It got me thinking though – what have bras ever done for women? Are they a vital undergarment for style and comfort or a symbol of male

International Club Project 2015 – Mary’s meals

International Club Project 2015 – Mary’s meals

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Mary’s Meals is an exciting charity that provides a meal a day in a place of education for nearly 1 million children in third world countries.  This ensures that the children have a good diet which gives them the strength to concentrate, learn and attain an education; academic performance and attendance rates dramatically increase when the provision of meals is introduced. We have been supporting this charity for the last three years through fundraising events such as Quiz Nights, Treasure Hunts, Coffee Mornings and Jewellery Parties as the money raised is used by the charity to buy locally grown food which helps the small-holder farmers in each region.  The average cost to feed a child for a whole school year is just £12.20.  For many children this is the only meal they receive that day.   The children also need the tools to assist them in their studies and the Backpack